Copyright versus ‘work for hire’

I’ve never really read contracts for publishing articles and reviews closely, but just recently I’ve caught wind of a change among many academic publishers. Instead of allowing the author to retain the copyright, publishers wish contributors to offer their writing as a ‘work for hire’, which is a category used for the intellectual products of […]

Let’s talk kula

I am interested in finding sources on the phenomenon of “kula talk” (Weiner 1992: 141) or “kula speech” (Munn 1992: 109). Many Kula researchers, including Damon, Weiner and Munn, mention a distinct genre of speech and discourse about the roads of kula valuables. The phenomenon is interesting because, as you all know, Malinowski argued that […]

Mobility and last names: Predictably, kinship is mistaken for genes, again

I read a recent op-ed in the New York Times, “Your Ancestors, Your Fate,” by Gregory Clark the other day. I can’t wait to talk about it in my kinship class next semester. It was a fascinating argument that kinship links have deep, lasting effects on individuals. Much as the social network analysis of the […]

Cafe New Guinea documents PNG village foodways

I’m looking forward to more mouthwatering food photography from Cafe New Guinea on Facebook, and their forthcoming TV show. The creators recently posted a photoset from Sibonai, Normanby, including a beautiful, shimmering, savory pot of mona (taro pudding) presented with hibiscus blossoms. Facebook commentators from across PNG and abroad are comparing notes on names for […]

Liberation and development in Glebe at Tranby College

In Glebe, the leafy suburb of Sydney, one can find a connection between the Australian labor movement, Anglo-Catholic Anglicanism, and the Territory of Papua at Tranby Aboriginal Co-operative College. Alf Clint was a labor activist who was drawn to the Christian socialism of the Anglo-Catholic community based at Christ Church St Laurence in Sydney. He […]